The Pink Leather Jackets Interview on Beer Booze & Bands

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The Pink Leather Jackets are one of my favourite bands. It seems like every song they make is a banner. Seriously they have a knack for making, anthem-level songs that get me and crowds all around the GTA JUMPING.

Now the official word about The Pink Leather Jackets

Deep from within the underground barrels of punk rock distortion emerges Pink Leather Jackets, the next thing you NEED to hear.

Pink Leather Jackets are a group of honest dudes from Toronto, with great harmonies, singing really well-written, catchy, original punk-rock songs at the top of their lungs. They placed runners-up in 97.7HTZ FM 2020 Rock search, have been nominated for a Mississauga MARTY award, recently featured on 94.9 The Rock’s Generation Next, and are currently set to open for Stereo’s upcoming southern Ontario tour in March 2022.

The band teamed up with Aaron Verdonk (StereosCloset Monster) to produce their latest record at Dream House Studios with Calvin Hartwick (OBGMsStrumbellas) co-producing and engineering.  The record was also mixed by Dave Schiffman (PUPStrumbellas) and mastered by Joao Carvalho (Tragically HipRush).

As the world begins to open up again and nature begins to heal, you’ll be sure to see Pink Leather Jackets rocking out everywhere they can from festivals to your local pub.  What You’re Doing To Me will be the first of many new anthems to come from Pink Leather Jackets.  Keep your eyes peeled and stay tuned…

PLJ consists of four strong professional artists

  • Chris Woolley, frontman, vocal and guitar 
  • Nathan Colucci, bass guitar and vocal

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