Sate – Howler

SATE embraces her wild with the new red-hot music video for “Howler”. It’s fierce, no FUCKS given and quite frankly, it’s badass.

NEW ALBUM “THE FOOL” OUT NOVEMBER 4TH

Embracing gritty blues, blistering hard rock, and faith in the universe, Toronto powerhouse shares the first single “Howler”. This song speaks to the strength and sensuality of The Empress in the tarot.  “Howler,”  is meant to be a middle finger to the people and systems that attempt to tame the Wild and Divine in women. The video was shot in Toronto and was directed by Andrew Hamilton of Trepalm. He has previously worked with Drake, Kenya Jade, and Our Lady Peace, to name a few. 

The song itself was written by SATE after a night in Hamburg, Germany at the Reeperbahn Festival along with fellow songwriter and newfound friend Adaline. What started off as a riff from SATE’s guitarist Kirt became a gritty hard rock ode to Women Who Run With the Wolves.  “Howler” is the first single off of SATE’s upcoming album, The Fool, out November 4th.

Howler Tack Cover Image

SATE is a cosmic being. Governing her life through astrology, numerology, tarot, and spiritual connection to her surroundings. Named after the hero of the Tarot deck, The Fool sees the musician pursuing her connection to the Tarot. This card is about beginnings, trust, and stepping off a cliff with ultimate faith in the universe. The album is an anthem for anyone who has dared to dream and work towards their greatest self. It is an evolution, embodying a cutting-edge sound, with catchy earworm melodies that will have you singing along after the record stops. Armed with ferocious soulful wails, relentless guitars, pulsating organs, and greasy grooves, it embarks on the journey bringing SATE’s dynamic powerhouse sound to the mainstream. 

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