Gene Simmons Pays Tribute to Lemmy with MotörheaGene Simmons honored the late Lemmy Kilmister with a heartfelt tribute during his recent performance at the Summer Breeze festival in São Paulo, Brazil. The iconic Kiss bassist, accompanied by his solo band, delivered a setlist brimming with classics, but it was their rendition of Motörhead’s legendary track “Ace of Spades” that stole the spotlight. Joined by guitarists Zach Throne and Brent Woods, along with drummer Brian Tichy, Simmons took to the stage to celebrate the enduring legacy of Lemmy. While Simmons channeled the spirit of the Motörhead frontman through his bass guitar prowess, Tichy assumed vocal duties, delivering a faithful rendition of the iconic track. The performance stayed true to the original, with the band opting for a straight cover that honored the perfectly paced intensity of “Ace of Spades.” Through their homage, Simmons and his band paid homage to Motörhead’s unparalleled contribution to the world of rock and metal. Beyond the stage, Lemmy’s impact continues to resonate within the music community. His hometown of Stoke-on-Trent in Staffordshire, England, is set to immortalize the legendary frontman with a statue in his honor. Standing at an impressive 2.25 meters tall, the statue, designed by local sculptor Andy Edwards, captures Lemmy in his iconic pose, facing a microphone while clutching his bass. However, the statue’s construction includes precautions to prevent potential mishaps, with a plinth towering 3 meters high to deter unauthorized climbing. This measure reflects the reverence and admiration that fans and authorities alike hold for Lemmy, ensuring that his legacy remains intact for generations to come. As the music world continues to mourn the loss of one of its most revered icons, tributes like Gene Simmons’ performance serve as poignant reminders of Lemmy’s enduring influence. Through his music and persona, Lemmy Kilmister will forever hold a revered place in the annals of rock and roll history. d’s ‘Ace of Spades’ Cover

Gene Simmons honored the late Lemmy Kilmister with a heartfelt tribute during his recent performance at the Summer Breeze festival in São Paulo, Brazil. The iconic Kiss bassist, accompanied by his solo band, delivered a setlist brimming with classics, but it was their rendition of Motörhead’s legendary track “Ace of Spades” that stole the spotlight.

Joined by guitarists Zach Throne and Brent Woods, along with drummer Brian Tichy, Simmons took to the stage to celebrate the enduring legacy of Lemmy. While Simmons channeled the spirit of the Motörhead frontman through his bass guitar prowess, Tichy assumed vocal duties, delivering a faithful rendition of the iconic track.

The performance stayed true to the original, with the band opting for a straight cover that honored the perfectly paced intensity of “Ace of Spades.” Through their homage, Simmons and his band paid homage to Motörhead’s unparalleled contribution to the world of rock and metal.

Beyond the stage, Lemmy’s impact continues to resonate within the music community. His hometown of Stoke-on-Trent in Staffordshire, England, is set to immortalize the legendary frontman with a statue in his honor. Standing at an impressive 2.25 meters tall, the statue, designed by local sculptor Andy Edwards, captures Lemmy in his iconic pose, facing a microphone while clutching his bass.

However, the statue’s construction includes precautions to prevent potential mishaps, with a plinth towering 3 meters high to deter unauthorized climbing. This measure reflects the reverence and admiration that fans and authorities alike hold for Lemmy, ensuring that his legacy remains intact for generations to come.

As the music world continues to mourn the loss of one of its most revered icons, tributes like Gene Simmons’ performance serve as poignant reminders of Lemmy’s enduring influence. Through his music and persona, Lemmy Kilmister will forever hold a revered place in the annals of rock and roll history.

Related Articles

The Day the Music Burned

It was the biggest disaster in the history of the music business — and almost nobody knew. This is the story of the 2008 Universal fire.
Chuck Berry, 1958.CreditCreditPhoto Illustration by Sean Freeman & Eve Steben for The New York Times. Source Photograph: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images.

Responses