Watch Faith No More’s Mike Patton refuse to lip-sync on Top Of The Pops in 1990

Mike Patton was having none of it when Faith No More made a rare Top Of The Pops appearance

If there’s one thing metalheads should know by now, it’s to never put constraints on Mike Patton. The Faith No More frontman has been pushing boundaries for some thirty years; not only do his main band tear down the barriers between metal, pop and funk music; he’s also dabbled in grindcore, opera and jazz in his downtime.

Back in 1990, British music programme and prime time mainstay Top Of The Pops made the mistake of telling Mike what the fuck to do. Admittedly, at the time, no one knew how eclectic a superstar he’d become. He was the baby of Faith No More, having joined the year prior, and was prepping for his first UK tour with the band when they were put on the airwaves.

Nonetheless, Mike quickly wiped his arse with the show’s notorious “performers must ‘play’ along to a backing track” policy. The quintet were doing the lead single of 1989’s The Real ThingFrom Out Of Nowhere, and it’s instantly apparent their singer isn’t taking it seriously. He swings his mic stand about with reckless abandon before miming with the kind of zany facial expressions usually reserved for Jim Carrey getting his pubes waxed.

Unlike many of his musical peers, Mike never goes full rock star tantrum, preventing the performance from going totally off the rails. It still blatantly highlighted the Top Of The Pops artifice, though, walking so that Nirvana could run when they intentionally butchered Smells Like Teen Spirit on the show two years later

Spotify

Related Articles

The Day the Music Burned

It was the biggest disaster in the history of the music business — and almost nobody knew. This is the story of the 2008 Universal fire.
Chuck Berry, 1958.CreditCreditPhoto Illustration by Sean Freeman & Eve Steben for The New York Times. Source Photograph: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images.

Music Is Facing a Mental Health Crisis

Money is tight while they work long and weird hours, travel incessantly, are isolated from their friends and family at home, and have ample access to drinks and drugs. They write, record, release, and promote, and then repeat the cycle over and over again. And now, more than ever, the industry demands constant content, lest they are forgotten in the ocean of songs hitting Spotify every Friday. But then they get in the van and, especially in Canada, drive absurd distances between low-paying gigs for a tour they likely had to book themselves.

Responses

Your email address will not be published.