THE GUITAR 1929-1969 | THE PLAYERS YOU NEED TO KNOW

In this episode I discuss the guitar players that every serious guitarist should know between 1929-1969. A comprehensive guide of styles covering Classical, Blues, Jazz, Country and Rock & Roll.

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Music in this video

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Song

Sweet Home Chicago

Artist

Robert Johnson

Licensed to YouTube by

SME (on behalf of Columbia); BMG Rights Management (US), LLC, LatinAutorPerf, UNIAO BRASILEIRA DE EDITORAS DE MUSICA – UBEM, Concord Music Publishing, BMI – Broadcast Music Inc., AMRA, ARESA, UMPG Publishing, LatinAutor – UMPG, LatinAutor – PeerMusic, Abramus Digital, Polaris Hub AB, and 10 Music Rights Societies

Song

I Can’t Quit You Baby (American Folk Blues Festival Version)

Artist

Otis Rush

Writers

Willie Dixon

Licensed to YouTube by

UMG (on behalf of Universal Music Enterprises); LatinAutor – PeerMusic, MINT_BMG, LatinAutorPerf, CMRRA, Abramus Digital, BMG Rights Management (US), LLC, and 8 Music Rights SocietiesSHOW LESS

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