Brian Adams Wants to Direct a Film

Bryan Adams wants to direct a movie.

The 62-year-old singer has also carved out a successful career as a photographer and he thinks his skills would be transferable to filmmaking too.

He said: “I would indeed be interested [in making a film]. I can easily see myself as a cinematographer, maybe even a director.

“I remember working with Laszlo Kovacs, who did ‘Easy Rider’, on one of my early videos.

“He had a glass round his neck and was constantly looking at the cloud formations waiting for the right light. Pure genius!”

Bryan thinks technological developments have completely changed the landscape for photography.

He told Ramp Style magazine: “With smartphone cameras that can capture every moment, everyone can be a photographer.

“The future will be more interactive and intense, and there will be more cameras documenting everything all the time.

“Police body cameras have infrared capabilities to check your body temperature, there will be more drones… these are just some examples.

“That’s not to say it’s a bad thing, because we are now seeing the world like never before.

“One of the most profoundly important things is people using their cameras to document atrocities. Everyone is a photojournalist.

“From eco-terrorism to George Floyd, photos and videos have completely changed our world overnight.”

While he’s photographed a range of people and places over the years, it’s his portraits of his family that mean the most to the ‘Heaven’ hitmaker.

Asked which of his photos say the most about him, he said: “The photos of my family. I treasure them more than anything.

“I sat with my grandfather and photographed him when he was 89. We talked about his time as a Royal Engineer in the World Wars. He was so humble. I miss my grandparents terribly.”

Bryan Adams – I’m So Happy It Hurts

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