BOSS Katana-50

Katana—the traditional sword carried by the historic samurai of Japan—is a symbol of honor, precision, and artistry in Japanese culture. Adopting the majestic sword’s name with pride, the Katana series presents guitar amplifiers with smooth, cutting tones honed by generations of dedication and expertise. Born of the development process behind the acclaimed Waza amplifier, these innovative amps embody BOSS’s determined pursuit of the ultimate rock sound. Featuring proprietary circuit designs and meticulous tuning, the Katana series combines traditional craftsmanship and breakthrough functions to produce true next-generation rock amplifiers.

With 50 watts of power and a custom 12-inch speaker, the Katana-50 delivers a commanding range of gig-worthy tones that gracefully slice through any band scenario. The amp also excels for home playing, with a uniquely efficient design and innovative Power Control that provides inspiring sound and response at low volumes. In addition, the Katana-50 includes integrated access to 55 BOSS effects, which are customizable using the free BOSS Tone Studio editor software. Up to 15 different effects can be configured in the amp at one time, enabling you to bring fully prepared tones to the stage in one amp.

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