Bon Scott’s High Voltage life as AC/DC frontman | On the Brink full documentary | Australian Story

In a world exclusive, Australian Story unravels the legend of AC/DC frontman Bon Scott, who was on the verge of becoming an international rock star when he died at age 33.

For the first time ever, the program has been granted access to Bon’s family and friends who provide fresh insights into his vulnerabilities and state of mind leading up to his untimely death in London in 1980. The program features the first interview with Bon’s younger brother Derek and is introduced by Brian Johnson, Bon’s successor with the band. Bruce Howe, a former bandmate who shared a house with Bon for five years, noticed a big change when he last saw him in late 1979. “He wasn’t bubbly and laughing. Maybe he’d come to the state where he’d achieved his dream, he found his holy grail, but found that his holy grail might have looked like an empty goblet,” he told the program. To this day, Bon Scott is considered one of the world’s best rock and roll singers.

About Australian Story: Putting the “real” back into reality television, Australian Story is an award-winning documentary series with no narrator and no agendas — just authentic stories told entirely in people’s own words. Take 30 minutes to immerse yourself in the life of an extraordinary Australian. They’re sometimes high profile, sometimes controversial, but always compelling. It’s television guaranteed to make you think and feel. New episodes are available every Monday.

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