Bands to see LIVE Aug 14-20

We’ve scoured the listings and picked 5 bands we think you should see LIVE this week. It may be summer and most people are at cottages or lazying in the park but if you are itching to see some high-energy live music we’ve got your fix right here.

August 16 – Surfer Blood – Hard Luck Bar
From Florida, you don’t wanna miss their waves of guitar (we promise no actual blood or surfers will be hurt).
https://www.facebook.com/events/842647379231088/

August 17 & 18 –Portugal. The Man – Danforth Music Hall
One of the biggest names in indie rock, Portugal. the Man is playing two shows at the Danforth this week. Also playing both of these shows is See Rock Live’s favorite Partner. Get there EARLY. The show starts at 7 pm.
https://www.facebook.com/events/259478874546865/

August 19 – Austra – Harbourfront Centre
FREE show at Harbourfront Centre. Can’t stress that enough, F-R-E-E. When Austra had its record release at the Mod Club in January, it was sold out a month in advance. Don’t miss your chance to see these homegrown heroes for FREE.
https://www.facebook.com/events/1577942068923036/

August 19 – Fashionism – Bovine Sex Club
Coming all the way from Vancouver, if you are into British punk and new wave and wanna see some West Coast Canadians doing just that, this is the show for you!
https://www.facebook.com/events/100366237289588/

August 20 – Deerhoof – The Great Hall
This coming weekend is Camp Wavelength and this year the Wavelength crew are trying out a different version of their camp, “day camp in the city”. There will be shows in parks and different venues around town. We definitely recommend seeing Deerhoof who is the festival closer on Sunday night at the Great Hall as the festival closer.
https://www.facebook.com/events/1233320453449856/

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